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BUCK AND BALL

MAY 2009

Meeting the second Wednesday of each month.  Next meeting May 13, 2009 at the Library Center,  4653 S Campbell,  Springfield,  Mo at 6:30 PM.

The May, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be held at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell, Springfield, Missouri on Wednesday the 13th at 6:30 pm and will feature  Civil War Round Table Member Steve Muckala on: "Boston Corbett & John Wilkes Booth: The Mad Hatter vs. The Assassin"

Is this a match between two bulky wrestlers to be seen on a big screen TV?  No, this is the story of Boston Corbett, the killer of John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Abraham Lincoln.  Corbett, a soldier in the 16th New York Cavalry, shot and killed Booth in April of 1865.  Or did he?  Come and hear the fascinating story of the life and times of Thomas G. Corbett as told by Round Table member Steve Muckala. He is retired and living on a farm outside of Marshfield. He was a member of the Oklahoma City Civil War Round Table for at least 20 years, served as president for 3 terms.  Steve has been a member of our Round Table for about 5 years.  He also  volunteers at the library at Wilson's Creek. 

 

Memorial Day

Memorial Day was originally known as Decoration Day because it was a time set aside to honor the nation's Civil War dead by decorating their graves. It was first widely observed on May 30, 1868, to commemorate the sacrifices of Civil War soldiers, by proclamation of General John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of former sailors and soldiers. On May 5, 1868, Logan declared in General Order No. 11 that: 

 The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land. In this observance no form of ceremony is prescribed, but posts and comrades will in their own way arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect as circumstances may permit.

During the first celebration of Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, after which 5,000 participants helped to decorate the graves of the more than 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery.

This 1868 celebration was inspired by local observances of the day in several towns throughout America that had taken place in the three years since the Civil War. In fact, several Northern and Southern cities claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day, including Columbus, Mississippi; Macon, Georgia; Richmond, Virginia; Boalsburg, Pennsylvania; and Carbondale, Illinois.

In 1966, the federal government, under the direction of President Lyndon Johnson, declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day. They chose Waterloo—which had first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866—because the town had made Memorial Day an annual, community-wide event during which businesses closed and residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags.

The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war). It is now celebrated in almost every State on the last Monday in May (passed by Congress with the National Holiday Act, P.L. 90 - 363, in 1971 to ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays)In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day a national holiday to be celebrated the last Monday in May. (Veterans Day, a day set aside to honor all veterans, living and dead, is celebrated each year on November 11.)

 

Today, Memorial Day is celebrated at Arlington National Cemetery with a ceremony in which a small American flag is placed on each grave. Also, it is customary for the president or vice-president to give a speech honoring the contributions of the dead and lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. About 5,000 people attend the ceremony annually.

Several Southern states continue to set aside a special day for honoring the Confederate dead, which is usually called Confederate Memorial Day:

  • Mississippi: Last Monday in April

  • Alabama: Fourth Monday in April

  • Georgia: April 26

  • North Carolina: May 10

  • South Carolina: May 10

  • Louisiana: June 3

  • Tennessee (Confederate Decoration Day): June 3

  • Texas (Confederate Heroes Day): January 19

  • Virginia: Last Monday in May

To help re-educate and remind Americans of the true meaning of Memorial Day, the "National Moment of Remembrance" resolution was passed on Dec 2000 which asks that at 3:00 p.m. local time, for all Americans "To voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a Moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to Taps."

 

 

The supporting Staff of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks:

  • Len Eagleburger, Media

  • Bill Piston, Web Page

  • Gary Brimmer, Membership

  • Paul and Carol Stickley, Refreshments

  • Len Eagleburger, Foundation Liaison

  • Don Garrett, Buck and Ball Editor

The address of our webpage is http://history.missouristate.edu/WGPiston/CWRT/cwrt.htm

 

2009 Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks Meetings

  • The June, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be held at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell, Springfield, Missouri on Wednesday the 10th at 6:30 pm and will feature Brian Grubbs on:  Community and Conflict: the Impact of the Civil War." 

  • The July, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be held at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell, Springfield, Missouri on Wednesday the 8th at 6:30 pm and will feature Educator, Historian, Civil War Round Table Member Todd Wilkinson on: "The Civil War in Arizona". 

  • The August, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be held at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell, Springfield, Missouri on Wednesday the 12th at 6:30 pm and will feature  Our Civil War Movie Night:  "The Battle of Wilson's Creek".  

  • The September, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be held at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell, Springfield, Missouri on Wednesday the 12th at 6:30 pm and will feature  Author, Rogers State University (OK) Professor of History M. Jane Johansson on a topic TBA.  

  • The October, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be our yearly Banquet ($25.00)  held at the Clarion Hotel, 3333 S. Glenstone, Springfield, Missouri on Friday the 9th at 6:30 pm in conjunction with our "Civil War West of The Mississippi" Seminar (October 9 & 10) and will feature: University of Missouri History Professor LeeAnn Whites on "Women in the Civil War"   

  • The November,  2009  meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will be held at the Library Center, 4653 S. Campbell, Springfield, Missouri on Wednesday the 11th at 6:30 pm and will feature  Missouri Department of Resources Historian James Denny on "The Battle of Island Mound" and the efforts to make the site a Missouri State Park.  Jim is a co-author of "The Civil War's First Blood: Missouri, 1854-1861".  

  • The December 9th, 2009 meeting:  Christmas Social, details to be announced.

  •  

 “Arts in the Park” at the Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield

  • Saturday, May 2, 7:00 pm Gum Springs Serenaders, 19th century music from Kansas City. Fretless banjos, fiddles, rib bones, and parlor guitar 

  • Saturday, May 9, 7:00 pm High Strung, a Bluegrass group from the Springfield-Branson area.

  • Saturday, May 16, 7:00 pm The Missouri State University Community Band.

  • Saturday, May 30, 7:00 pm Suzanne and Jim, a duo providing “old” entertainment.

  • Saturday, June 6, 7:00 pm Crazy Mule, Bluegrass, Ozark Mountain tradition.

  • Saturday, June 13, 11:00 am to 4:00 pm Ray House Jamboree, a bluegrass music festival in front of the historic Ray House.

  • Saturday June 20, 7:00 pm The 135th Military Army Band (Springfield Reserves).

All concerts are FREE and open to the public except for the June 13th event at the Ray House where the regular tour road admission is $5.00 per person or $10 per car load. Please bring blankets or lawn chairs for all performances. We appreciate your continued interest and support of Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield and we look forward to seeing you at these special events. Parking will be available at the Battlefield Visitor Center main parking area. If you need directions or have any questions, please call 417-732-2662 or check the park’s website at www.nps.gov/wicr

 

April Meeting Minutes

 President Jeff Patrick brought the meeting to order at 6:44 p.m.  Approximately 70 people were present. 

Jeff started the business portion of the meeting by reading the minutes from the March meeting. The minutes were approved as read.  He then asked Dan Cunningham to present the Treasurer’s Report.  As of April 8, 2009, the Round Table showed a balance of $6,938.70.  Membership Director Gary Brimmer then reported that the Round Table had a total of 96 paid members. 

 Ted Hillmer, Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield superintendent then gave an update on activities at the battlefield.  He reported that the battlefield had received the donation of an original First National Pattern Confederate flag, captured by a battle participant, possibly during the Wilson’s Creek Campaign.  He asked the Round Table to consider making a donation to cover expenses for the appraisal.  Superintendent Hillmer also discussed upcoming Arts in the Park events in May and June, and the need for more volunteers during “Yellow Fever Season,” (school group visits in May).

Jeff then introduced new visitors and welcomed all.  He mentioned that Phelps Camp, Sons of Union Veterans is selling the book Chronicles of Lexington, a reprint of a rare 1863 booklet, to raise money for a new monument at the Battle of Lexington State Historic Site.

Jeff mentioned that Hal Funk was to present a program on the life of Mary Todd Lincoln at the Library Station on April 16 at 7 p.m.

Bill Piston presented the books for the opportunity drawing.

---Break---

After the break, Kip Lindberg and Jeff presented “Captured By Shadow and Light:  Photography in the Trans-Mississippi Theater, 1861-1865.”  They then took questions from the audience.

The opportunity drawing was then held.

The meeting was adjourned at 8:20 p.m.

Jeff Patrick

for Chris Buffat

 

“Beyond Campaigns and Commanders”

Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks

October 9 & 10, 2009

Friday Evening, October 9

6:00-6:30  Registration and Social Hour
6:30-6:45  Welcome and Introductions
6:45-8:00  Dinner and Door Prizes
8:00-9:00  Presentation, Richard W. Hatcher, “The H.L. Hunley, Then and Now”

Saturday, October 10

7:30 a.m.  Doors Open
8:00-8:30  Registration
8:30-9:45  Welcome, Introduction, and Session 1:  LeeAnn Whites,  Occupied Women:  Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War
9:45-10:00 Break and Browsing
10:00-11:00  Session 2:  Blair Tarr, Save the Flags:  The Kansas Civil War Battle Flag Restoration Program
11:00-11:30  Break and Browsing
11:30-12:30  Lunch
12:30-1:30  Session 3:  Doug Scott, Battlefield Archeology:  The Trans-Mississippi Theater
1:30-1:45  Break and Browsing
1:45-2:45  Session 4:  Bill Gurley, Yankee Bullets, Southern Blood: A glimpse at Confederate medical care in the Trans-Mississippi through the illustrated casebook of Dr. Henry Dye
2:45-3:00 Break and Browsing
3:00-4:00  Session 5:  Richard W. Hatcher, Fort Sumter, 1829-1947
4:00-5:00 Session 6:  Kip Lindberg and Matt Matthews, Origins of the Kansas Redlegs
5:00 p.m. Raffle drawings and closing remarks

 

Fellow members of the CWRTO:

We continue to have wonderful attendance at our monthly meetings.  Last month many members and guests joined us for a discussion of Civil War photography—we even learned the entire wet plate photographic process!

 This month, CWRTO member Steve Muckala will examine the many myths regarding John Wilkes Booth and his killer, Boston Corbett.  Did Booth survive his encounter with Federal troops at the Garrett Farm?  What happened to Boston Corbett after he shot up the Kansas state legislature building?  Steve will fill us in.

 Plans are now set for our conference this October.  We have a great lineup of speakers scheduled, with many fascinating topics.  Registration forms will be available in the newsletter and at upcoming meetings. 

In other news, Don Garrett has asked to be replaced as editor of the “Buck and Ball.”  Don has served as our editor for several years, and we thank him for consistently giving us a high-quality newsletter.  Thanks Don!  If you are interested in becoming the next editor of the “B&B,” please see me at the next meeting, or drop me a line.

And finally, the folks at Savas Publishing have made us an offer—if any member of the CWRTO (or family or friends) purchases one of their books, and mentions the secret code (CWRTOzarks), they will donate 30% of the book’s cost to our organization.  Have a look at their offerings at www.savasbeatie.com.

I look forward to seeing you all on May 13.

Regards,

Jeff Patrick

President, CWRTO  

 WAR ROUND TABLE OF THE OZARKS

P.O. BOX 3451

SPRINGFIELD, MO 65808-3451

 

MARCH 2009

Meeting the second Wednesday of each month.  Next meeting March 11, 2008 at the Library Center,  4653 S Campbell,  Springfield,  Mo at 6:30 PM   

The March, 2009 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks will feature Father Moses Berry, "Honoring Our Shared Heritage."  Fr. Moses is pastor of Theotokos "Unexpected Joy" Orthodox Christian Church.  His family has occupied the same property in Ash Grove, Missouri, since 1871, a rare occurrence for African Americans in the Ozarks.  Berry has restored a family cemetery established in 1875 and dedicated to "Slaves, Indian, and Paupers."  The cemetery is on the National Register of Historic Places. Berry is also curator of the Ozarks Afro-American Heritage Museum, which houses an extensive collection of photographs and artifacts relating to rural Afro-American life in the surrounding area.  Berry has appeared on ‘Good Morning America’ and on the National Geographic channel, and a documentary about his work was created by Ozarks Public Television. 

 

 

President:                               Jeff Patrick

                                                732-7308

                                                tam1rn@juno.com

Vice President:                      Jim Millikin

 889-1848                                                   

Treasurer:                              Dan Cunningham

                                                Dan04654@wmconnect.com

 Program Chairman:            Teresa Hernandez

987-7776

                                                   TKHernandez@gmail.com

 Secretary:                               Chris Buffat   

                                                 cbuffat@sbcglobal.net                               

At Large Member:                Len Eagleburger

                                                leneagleburger@sbcglobal.net

 Wilson’s Creek:                     Ted Hillmer                                                                 

T_John_Hillmer@nps.gov

Past President:                       Steve Buffat

sjbuffat@sbcglobal.net

 

The supporting Staff of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks:

 

Len Eagleburger……….Media

Bill Piston……..……..Web Page

Gary Brimmer ……....Membership

Paul and Carol Stickley….…..Refreshments

Len Eagleburger ………. Foundation Liaison

Don Garrett………………...Buck and Ball Editor

The address of our webpage is http://history.missouristate.edu/WGPiston/CWRT/cwrt.htm

 

 

The Museum serves to help us remember the past - the sorrows and triumphs of generations of Black families in southwest Missouri communities.

 

 

The Ozarks Afro-American Museum is a place where people of all races and nationalities can together honor the contributions of our ancestors - a shared heritage.

Fr. Moses Berry, a priest of the Orthodox Church in America, opened the OAAHM in October of 2002. It quickly became an important part of Ash Grove life, attracting many visitors.

 

 

Nearby is an historic cemetery owned by the Berry family since 1875, dedicated for the burial of "Slaves, Paupers and Indians," who for many years were excluded from other burial places. The "Old Negro" or Berry Cemetery, is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites.

 

In 1872, William Berry bought a farm in Ash Grove, and the Berrys have been a constant presence in the town since that time.

The family has preserved priceless artifacts from slavery times, including the lock from Wallace White's shackles, but also photographs, paintings, clothing and other unusual items that testify to the rich and productive he, his ancestors, and many others lived in the Ozarks.
Not only does the OAAHM preserve this unusual collection, but each piece has a story. Fr. Moses, a descendant of the Whites and the Berry's, has a wealth of information about each piece, handed down through a rich oral tradition. The OAAHM also has a small collection of antique African textiles and implements
 

Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Park

Volunteers in Parks

Volunteers at Wilson’s Creek assist the National Park Service in a variety of ways.

Living history volunteers present small arms and artillery demonstrations and give tours of the historic Ray House in reproduction period clothing.

Interpretation volunteers lead tours of Bloody Hill, the Ray House and caravan tours of the battlefield in modern clothing. They also give map program and film introductions and provide information to park visitors. Other interpretation volunteers work with the photograph, slide, museum and library collections.

Resource Management volunteers help with the restoration effort by collecting plant samples, compiling computer data, and assisting with controlled "burns" of landscape restoration areas.

Other volunteers provide support to the Administration and Maintenance Divisions of the park. For further information on the Volunteers-in-Parks program at Wilson's Creek National Battlefield, contact the park volunteer coordinator:

Dave Hutson
Park Ranger
6424 W. Farm Road 182
Republic, MO 65738
(417) 732-2662

2009 Volunteer Meeting

Date:  March 28, 2009
Time:  9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

The 2009 Volunteer Meeting will take place in the Visitor Center`s Multi-purpose Room.  Anyone interested in the volunteer program at Wilson`s Creek is encouraged to attend.  We will discuss volunteer opportunities, the 2009 schedule of events, policies and procedures and upcoming training sessions.  Following the meeting, an orientation tour of the battlefield will be provided for all new volunteers (1-3 p.m.)   

 

Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources will host a Civil War encampment on Saturday, March 21, at Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site near Ash Grove, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  The theme of the day is the “Boones and the Civil War?”   This event is free of charge, and the public is invited to attend.

Re-enactors from the 4th Missouri Infantry, Company E, and other units will be on site throughout the day.  Drills and demonstrations will be offered at 10:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.  At 1 p.m., Dr. William Piston, noted Civil War historian and author and History Professor at Missouri State University will give a presentation on the Civil War in southwest Missouri.  David Roggensees, administrator of the historic site, will follow Dr. Piston’s talk with a talk on the Boone family in the war.  An exhibit detailing the story of the Boone family and farm during the Civil War era will be on display in the contact station throughout the day.

Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site preserves the last home and grave of Missouri frontiersman Nathan Boone.  Though Boone died in 1856, his children were caught in the storm of war that enveloped Missouri and the nation.  The historic site is located 1.5 miles north of Ash Grove on State Highway V.  Call the historic site at (417) 751-3266 for more information.

For more information, contact the historic site at (417) 751-3266 or the Department of Natural Resources toll free at 1-800-334-6946 (voice) or 1-800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf). For more information about Missouri state parks and historic sites, visit the Web at www.mostateparks.com.   

The 2009 Liberty University Civil War Seminar

The Reel Civil War:  The Civil War in the Cinema

 

On March 27-28,  2009, Liberty University will present its 13th annual Civil War Seminar. This year's program is entitled The Reel Civil War:  The Civil War in the Cinema.

Featured speakers include the following nationally renowned authors whose books are familiar to all Civil War enthusiasts:

--Bruce Chadwick--The Reel Civil War:  Myth Making in American Film

--A Dramatic Homage to Gone With the Wind

--Ron Maxwell—Producer/Director of Gettysburg and Gods and Generals 

--CBN Anchorman Lee Webb-- Walking a Minefield: Reporting the Civil War Today 

-- David Sachsman-- Memory and Myth: The Civil War in Fiction and Film 

-- Ken Elston-- Raising the Ghost: Composing Engaging Theatre from the Story of John   S. Mosby

--Mel Reid--Glory, Twenty Years after the Fact

-- Katharine Lane Antolini-- Scarlett O'Hara as the Confederate Woman

-- Paul Ashdown-- From Cold Mountain to the Carpathians: Filming a Civil War Odyssey in Transylvania

--Dr. Brenda Ayres—Reconciliation in Civil War Movies: The Colt, Shenandoah, Mosby’s Marauders, Little Colonel, Little Rebel, Johnny Shiloh

-- Kevin Hershberger of Lions Gate Films—Filming The Civil War Documentary

--Kenny Rowlette—Civil War Films of the Centennial Celebration (1961-1965)

--Dr. Brian Wills-- Screening History: Hollywood’s Depiction of the American Civil War

In addition to the speakers' presentations, there will be numerous exhibits of Civil War artifacts and memorabilia for the public, vendors of Civil War items, and a special exhibit of Civil War movie posters.

The Seminar will conclude with a special period church service on Sunday, March 29, led by the Reverend Alan Farley of Reenactor’s Mission for Jesus Christ.

The event will be held at the Kirkley Hotel on Friday, March 27, 2009, and the Saturday, March 28, 2009, session will be held in DeMoss Hall on the campus of Liberty University, located in Lynchburg, Virginia. Everyone is encouraged to secure reservations for this seminar by Wednesday, March 25. Admission to the seminar is $65 (which includes all of the seminar sessions, the Friday night banquet, and Saturday's luncheon). Admission for Friday only is $35; admission for Saturday only is $40.

Special lodging rates at the Kirkley Hotel of Lynchburg are available for those who will be attending the seminar. For pricing and location of lodging, call 434- 237-6333.

For special group pricing for the seminar or more information, call 434-592-4366 or email klburdeaux@liberty.edu.  You may also access more info at http://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?PID=8516.

 On April 8, 2009, from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m.,The Library Center will host "The Civil War Artifacts Road Show.”  Do you have Civil War era heirlooms? Do you know their historical significance and how best to preserve them?  Bring your treasures for assessment by scholars and professionals.  After your collection has been reviewed, you will have an opportunity to have the items scanned or photographed, and receive a free CD or DVD.  If you choose these digital copies will also be considered for the Library's ongoing imaging project, "Community and Conflict: the Impact of the Civil War." 

 In the near future this project will host digital collections online on the Springfield-Greene County Library District and Missouri State Library’s Missouri Digital Heritage web sites. 

 If you have questions, contact Brian Grubbs at 417.883.5310 x140. 

 I have original regimental Civil War Pay Muster Rolls for the state of
Missouri as well as many other states that I am willing to sell.  Would any
of your members be interested in buying any of these?  Please let me know
what state and company you are interested in. The cost is between $50-$80
each.  THESE ARE ALL ORIGINALS.

Please contact me at:    Tom Maiyer
    419-529-5162

Fellow members of the CWRTO:

It was great to see so many members and guests at our February meeting.  Hal Funk gave an excellent presentation, and we all enjoyed learning more about the violent career of “Bloody Bill” Anderson, one of Missouri’s most famous guerrillas.  In March we will hear from Father Moses Berry, who will share the fascinating story of Nathan Boone and the African-Americans who worked the Boone farm and became part of that famous American family. 

 Program chair Teresa Hernandez has lined up many other great speakers for the rest of the year.  Don’t miss a single meeting!

 And speaking of great speakers, we will have additional details on the October conference to share with you at the March meeting. 

At the February meeting, I was elected president and Jim Millikin was elected vice-president of our great organization.  We appreciate your vote of confidence, and we will try our best to serve the CWRTO. 

I look forward to seeing you all on March 11

Regards,

Jeff Patrick, President, CWRTO   

CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE OF THE OZARKS

P.O. BOX 3451

SPRINGFIELD, MO 65808-3451

 

 

 

 

 

JANUARY 2009

Meeting the second Wednesday of each month.  Next meeting January 14, 2008, at the Library Center,  4653 S Campbell,  Springfield,  Mo. at 6:30 PM.  The January meeting will feature John Rutherford and will kickoff the Springfield-Greene County Library’s Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Series with a program introducing us to Abraham Lincoln and his Kentucky affiliations.

Where was the Sixteenth President of the United States born?  Are any historic sites in Kentucky affiliated with Abraham Lincoln or his family?  Which Kentuckians or Kentucky issues most influenced Abraham Lincoln’s life?  If anyone has asked any of these questions, then join us for John’s program "Abraham Lincoln:  His Kentucky Connections."

John Rutherford is a co-coordinator of the Springfield-Greene County Library’s Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial programs and is a past president of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks.  He has presented a number of programs for members over the years, including the Battle of Springfield, Return to Chickamauga, Battle of Cheat Mountain, and a biographical sketch about Missouri Governor John Smith Phelps’ Springfield family. John has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Historic Preservation from Middle Tennessee State University.

 

Officers of the Round Table

*       Acting President: Jeff Patrick; 732-7308; jeffrey_patrick@nps.gov

*       Treasurer:Dan Cunningham; Dan04654@wmconnect.com

*       Program Chairman: Teresa Hernandez; 987-7776; TKHernandez@gmail.com

*       Secretary: Chris Buffat; cbuffat@sbcglobal.net

*       At Large Member: Len Eagleburger; leneagleburger@sbcglobal.net

*       Wilson’s Creek: Ted Hillmer; T_John_Hillmer@nps.gov

*       Past President: Steve Buffatt

The supporting Staff of the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks:

  • Media, Len Eagleburger
  • Web Page, Bill Piston
  • Historian, Bill Piston
  • Membership, Gary Brimmer
  • Book Chairman, TBD
  • Buck & Ball Editor, Don Garrett
  • Foundation Liaison, Steve Buffat
  • Refreshments, Paul & Carol Stickley
  • Fund Raising, Jim Scaminaci

 

The address of our webpage is http://history.missouristate.edu/WGPiston/CWRT/cwrt.htm

 

Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks

Minutes for the meeting of December 10th, 2008

President, Steve Buffat, brought the meeting to order at 6:43 P.M. approximately 42 people were present.  He started by welcoming new members and visitors.  Then he asked if there were any additions or corrections needed to be made to the previous month’s minutes.  The minutes were approved as published.  President Buffat also read the Treasurer’s Report on behalf of Jim Millikin who was absent; it showed a balance of $4722.02 as of December 10, 2008.

Ted Hillmer then shared the plans of the construction of the front gate that is currently underway.  He then presented the new 2009 Wilson’s Creek calendars.  He also mentioned the upcoming luminary that will be held this month and he asked for volunteers.

President Buffat then went on to say that the CWRT currently has 132 members, and he encouraged members to pay their dues just as soon as they can.  As memberships are renewed, members will be rewarded with the new 2009 Wilson’s Creek calendars. Then he told the members about the new improvements to the Membership Chairman’s role during the monthly meetings. 

Election of Officers / Board of Directors is this evening for 2009.  President Buffat presented the Officers / Board of Directors slate:

  • President, Stephen J. Buffat
  • Vice President, Jeff Patrick
  • Treasurer, Dan Cunningham
  • Program Chairman, Teresa Hernandez
  • Secretary, Chris Buffat
  • At Large Member, Len Eagleburger
  • Wilson’s Creek Representative, Ted Hillmer
  • Past President, Tom Debo

 The officers / board members were approved and passed.  Then the staff slate was presented.

 

  • Media, Len Eagleburger
  • Web Page, Bill Piston
  • Historian, Bill Piston
  • Membership, Gary Brimmer
  • Book Chairman, TBD
  • Buck & Ball Editor, Don Garrett
  • Foundation Liaison, Steve Buffat
  • Refreshments, Paul & Carol Stickley
  • Fund Raising, Jim Scaminaci

 

At this point in the evening, we broke for our Christmas dinner

             -----Dinner-----

 Afterwards, President Buffat then led everyone to the auditorium for the new Wilson’s Creek film, “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek”.

             -----Movie-----

 After the movie, Bill Piston presented the books for the evenings opportunity drawings.

John Purtell won The Seven Days by Clifford Dowdey and Jim Scamanaci won Eyewitnesses at the Battlefield of Stones River, compiled and edited by David R. Logsdon. Bill then asked for assistance in filling the vacancy as book chairman. 

 President Buffat then spoke of the Round Table annual dinner for 2009.  The dinner will be held 9 October and will be in conjunction with our 2009 Civil War Conference, 10 October.  The Elderhostel Civil War program will immediately follow the conference beginning on Sunday, 11 October and will conclude Friday, 16 October. 

 Meeting Adjourned 8:35 P.M.

 

Christopher D. Buffat

Secretary

Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks

  

 

 

 

  

 Photos from the December 10, 2008 Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks Dinner and Meeting

 


Hartville   

Other Names: None

Location: Wright County

Campaign: Marmaduke’s First Expedition into Missouri (1862-63)

Date(s): January 9-11, 1863

Principal Commanders: Col. Samuel Merrill [US]; Brig. Gen. John S. Marmaduke [CS]

Forces Engaged: Detachment of infantry, cavalry, and artillery (approx. 700) [US]; 4th Division, I Corps, Trans-Mississippi Department [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 407 total (US 78; CS 329)

Description: John S. Marmaduke led a Confederate raid into Missouri in early January 1863. This movement was two-pronged. Col. Joseph C. Porter led one column, comprising his Missouri Cavalry Brigade, out of Pocahontas, Arkansas, to assault Union posts around Hartville, Missouri. When he neared Hartville, on January 9, he sent a detachment forward to reconnoiter. It succeeded in capturing the small garrison and occupying the town. The same day, Porter moved on toward Marshfield. On the 10th, some of Porter’s men raided other Union installations in the area before catching up with Marmaduke’s column east of Marshfield. Marmaduke had received reports of Union troops approaching to surround him and prepared for a confrontation. Col. Samuel Merrill, commander of the approaching Union column, arrived in Hartville, discovered that the garrison had already surrendered and set out after the Confederates. A few minutes later, fighting began. Marmaduke feared being cut off from his retreat route back to Arkansas so he pushed Merrill’s force back to Hartville, where it established a defense line. Here, a four-hour battle ensued in which the Confederates suffered many casualties but compelled the Yankees to retreat. Although they won the battle, the Confederates were forced to abandon the raid and return to friendly territory.

Result(s): Confederate victory

 

REMINDER:

2009 Dues for the Round Table are due.

You may mail payment or bring to the next meeting. Thank you.

Individual                   $   20.00

Couple                        $   30.00

Student                       $   10.00

Lifetime                      $  200.00

From President Buffat:

Hello again everyone.  I hope you’re all having a great Holiday Season!

It was good to see everyone during our Christmas social in December.  We had a great time; lots of delicious food and fantastic company.  There were approximately 42 people in attendance.  As part of the evening, we watched the newly edited version of the Wide Awake Films; “The Battle of Wilsons Creek” The film was excellent.  A big thanks to Ted Hillmer and Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield for letting us use their facilities for this event.  

I want to take this time to say “Thank You” for the opportunity to serve you this past year as your President.  It has been a privilege and an honor.  Over the last few years, as an organization, we’ve accomplished so much together.  We put on a very successful Civil War Conference.  We put on an Elderhostel Civil War program that was well received.  This program was so successful, that the Elderhostel program directors have asked us to put the same program on each year at least once or twice a year.  As a group, we’ve traveled to numerous battlefields together, we’ve volunteered at Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield and we’ve assisted in and drove battlefield memorials.  The list goes on.  I thank all of those who have donated funds, materials, and you’re volunteer time.   

In the last several of weeks, some major things have changed at my work and even though I was going to serve as your President for 2009, I regret to say that I must resign as President of the Round Table.  My resignation is effective immediately.  This was a very hard decision for me but after much thought and consideration, I felt it was necessary.  Even though I will not be in a leadership role in the Round Table, I will still be an active member. 

I want you all to know that I've thoroughly enjoyed working with each of you over the last few years as your President and Vice President.  I appreciate your dedication, desire and drive to make the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks the organization that it is today.  It’s been a privilege to associate with all of you.   

Steve Buffat

President

CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE OF THE OZARKS

P.O. BOX 3451

SPRINGFIELD, MO 65808-3451

 

FEBRUARY 2009

Meeting the second Wednesday of each month.  Next meeting February 11, 2008 at the Library Center,  4653 S Campbell,  Springfield,  Mo at 6:30 PM.

The February meeting will feature Hal Funk, a retired Missouri State University professor,  speaking on the famous guerrilla "Bloody Bill" Anderson and Missouri's most notorious guerrilla band.   Hal, a Civil War Round Table Member for many years and past program director, is an avid history buff and  gives presentations on local, state, and national historic events to groups in the Springfield area. 

 

Officers

Staff 

 

The address of our webpage is http://history.missouristate.edu/WGPiston/CWRT/cwrt.htm

 

Minutes for the meeting of January 14, 2009

Opportunity Drawings-

Myths After Abraham Lincoln -Bruce Catton

The Humorous Mr. Lincoln- Keith Warren Jennison

 An anthology of works by many authors concerning Lincoln

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes-

Acting President, Jeff Patrick brought the meeting to order at 6:40 P.M.  Approximately 53 people were present for the night’s meeting.  He started by welcoming new members and visitors.  He went right to business concerning the CWRT’s presidency, with Steve Buffat’s resignation as President; Jeff asked the membership if anyone was interested in becoming the president, to speak with him.

Treasurer, Dan Cunningham, presented the treasurer’s report.  As of January 14, 2009 the Civil War Round Table showed a balance of $5746.01. 

Membership Chairman, Gary Brimmer, passed out membership forms to the members and visitors to renew their membership more efficiently and to reduce hassle.

Battlefield Superintendent, Ted Hillmer, gave an update on Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield.  He talked about the ‘Yellow Bus Fever’ and to remind the membership that volunteers are always needed for this time of year and would be greatly appreciated.  He then spoke about the Moonlight Tour and how bad winds caused it to be postponed.

A library representative announced that there would be a Civil War Era Road Show, the next month.

Then Bill Piston presented the books for the opportunity drawings.  He then asked if there would be anyone interested in taking over the Book Raffling Chairmanship to speak with him.

            -----Break-----

After the break, speaker John Rutherford gave a presentation on Abraham Lincoln’s connections with Kentucky.  Afterwards he answered questions from the membership.

Book Drawings were then held: Tom Sweeny won Myths After Abraham Lincoln, Tim Gargarton won The Humorous Mr. Lincoln, and Dan Cunningham won the Anthology of Abraham Lincoln works.

Meeting Adjourned 8:26 P.M.

Christopher D. Buffat

Secretary

Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks

REMINDER:

2009 Dues for the Round Table are due. You may mail payment or bring to the next meeting. Thank you.

Individual, $20.00

Couple, $30.00

Student, $10.00

Lifetime, $  200.00

 

 

Missouri's African American Troops

There were seven African American regiments enrolled in Missouri. These soldiers fought in battles in Tennessee, Louisiana, Texas, and Alabama.

The first black regiment from Missouri was recruited in June 1863 at Schofield Barracks in St. Louis. More than 300 men enlisted. The regiment was called the First Regiment of Missouri Colored Infantry. It later became the 62nd U.S. Regiment of Colored Infantry. Over 3,700 Missouri African Americans enrolled in the army in 1864. Most black soldiers served in the U.S. Army. But there was one African American unit in Missouri's state militia. It was from Hannibal and had nearly 100 members.

Not everyone in Missouri liked having African American soldiers. Some slave owners were upset at losing slaves, which they regarded as property. Other citizens worried that the slaves who did not serve in the army would rebel and cause trouble. Some groups of Confederate bushwhackers tried to frighten African Americans away from recruiting stations. None of this stopped black Missourians from serving as soldiers, though. It is estimated that nearly 8,400 African American soldiers enrolled in Missouri regiments. Even more African American Missourians enrolled in out-of-state units.

Many of the black soldiers knew that serving in the military gave them a chance to be free. They knew that freedom also meant responsibility as a citizen and a new beginning for their families. A certain group of soldiers in the 62nd United States Colored Infantry took their new responsibility seriously. They knew that education was necessary to being successful in many aspects of their lives.

The soldiers from the 62nd wanted to help provide education for Missouri's African American citizens. Some of the soldiers had learned to read and write while they served in the military. They wanted to continue to learn once the war was over. So they decided to raise money and start a school for all Missouri's freed men and women. Together with soldiers from the 65th Infantry, the 62nd raised over $5000 to start a school. In 1866, in a log cabin outside of Jefferson City, a school called Lincoln Institute was created. Today that school is called Lincoln University.

 

The 2009 Liberty University Civil War Seminar

The Reel Civil War:  The Civil War in the Cinema

On March 27-28,  2009, Liberty University will present its 13th annual Civil War Seminar. This year's program is entitled The Reel Civil War:  The Civil War in the Cinema.

Featured speakers include the following nationally renowned authors whose books are familiar to all Civil War enthusiasts:

--Bruce Chadwick--The Reel Civil War:  Myth Making in American Film

--A Dramatic Homage to Gone With the Wind

--Ron Maxwell—Producer/Director of Gettysburg and Gods and Generals 

--CBN Anchorman Lee Webb-- Walking a Minefield: Reporting the Civil War Today 

-- David Sachsman-- Memory and Myth: The Civil War in Fiction and Film 

-- Ken Elston-- Raising the Ghost: Composing Engaging Theatre from the Story of John   S. Mosby

--Mel Reid--Glory, Twenty Years after the Fact

-- Katharine Lane Antolini-- Scarlett O'Hara as the Confederate Woman

-- Paul Ashdown-- From Cold Mountain to the Carpathians: Filming a Civil War Odyssey in Transylvania

--Dr. Brenda Ayres—Reconciliation in Civil War Movies: The Colt, Shenandoah, Mosby’s Marauders, Little Colonel, Little Rebel, Johnny Shiloh

-- Kevin Hershberger of Lions Gate Films—Filming The Civil War Documentary

--Kenny Rowlette—Civil War Films of the Centennial Celebration (1961-1965)

--Dr. Brian Wills-- Screening History: Hollywood’s Depiction of the American Civil War

In addition to the speakers' presentations, there will be numerous exhibits of Civil War artifacts and memorabilia for the public, vendors of Civil War items, and a special exhibit of Civil War movie posters.

The Seminar will conclude with a special period church service on Sunday, March 29, led by the Reverend Alan Farley of Reenactor’s Mission for Jesus Christ.

The event will be held at the Kirkley Hotel on Friday, March 27, 2009, and the Saturday, March 28, 2009, session will be held in DeMoss Hall on the campus of Liberty University, located in Lynchburg, Virginia. Everyone is encouraged to secure reservations for this seminar by Wednesday, March 25. Admission to the seminar is $65 (which includes all of the seminar sessions, the Friday night banquet, and Saturday's luncheon). Admission for Friday only is $35; admission for Saturday only is $40.

Special lodging rates at the Kirkley Hotel of Lynchburg are available for those who will be attending the seminar. For pricing and location of lodging, call 434- 237-6333.

For special group pricing for the seminar or more information, call 434-592-4366 or email klburdeaux@liberty.edu.

 You may also access more info at http://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?PID=8516.

February is Black History Month

 

File:Frederick Douglass portrait.jpg

"I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong."

Frederick Douglass

 

 

Fellow members of the CWRTO:

Greetings!  2009 is shaping up to be a very busy year for our organization.  John Rutherford kicked off the year with an excellent presentation at the January meeting on President Abraham Lincoln’s Kentucky connections, reminding us that we will soon be celebrating the 200th anniversary of Mr. Lincoln’s birth. 

Next month we will be learning more about “Bloody Bill” Anderson, one of Missouri’s most famous guerrilla fighters.  Thanks to Teresa Hernandez, we have other great presentations scheduled this year.  We are also finalizing plans for another CWRTO conference, which will be held at the Clarion this October. 

Of course, all these events require funding, so I encourage everyone to pay their 2009 dues as soon as possible. 

And finally, I would like to thank past president Steve Buffat for his service to the CWRTO.   Although Steve will be unable to continue serving as president this year, he will join the board as past president.  Please join me in thanking him for his hard work on behalf of the organization.   We will elect a new president and vice-president at the February meeting. I look forward to seeing you all on February 11

Regards,

Jeff Patrick, Acting President, CWRTO   

 

CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE OF THE OZARKS

P.O. BOX 3451

SPRINGFIELD, MO 65808-3451