ANCIENT ROMAN ROADS

 

 

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Roads and Travel
            The Roman Empire had an excellent system of roads. Most roads were built by the army. This is because the roads were built mainly to allow soldiers to travel quickly in wartime. However, they also helped trade. The roads made it easier for merchants to carry their goods around the empire.

            Sometimes wealthy people went on sight-seeing trips, but most people did not travel unless they had to. They lived in the same town or village all their lives and rarely left it. Some Roman roads are still used today. They are easy to spot on a map because they often run for long distances in very straight lines.
 

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(A) PAVING SLABS
The road was paved with hard-wearing stone slabs. The middle of the road was made higher than the sides so rain would drain off.

(B) LAYERS OF PEBBLES AND GRAVEL
A layer of pebbles and gravel was rammed down to form a hard surface.

(C) DIGGING
The Romans dug a trench 1 metre deep and 7 metres wide. Drainage ditches were also dug alongside the road.

(D) FOUNDATIONS
The trench was covered with sand and large stones. These were packed tightly to make strong foundations.
 

 
 
 

 

Construction Fossa Pavimentum Statument Rudus Summum Dorsum Building roads

 

 

Milestones
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A Roman mile was about 1,437 metres long. Each mile along a road was marked off by a stone. They were like modern road signs. They told the traveller how far he had to go to reach the next town.

 

A street in Cuma

 

Paestum